Ali’s blog

Mostly quant stuff with occasional digressions

Diversity and America’s future

Posted by alifinmath on March 15, 2008

A piece in today’s NYT magazine:

Obama wins in major urban areas but can’t seem to win in urbanized states, while Clinton wins in rural communities but consistently loses in rural states. Why?

… It is also possible, however, that the disparity between Obama’s performance in urban primaries and rural caucuses tells us something larger — and counterintuitive — about race in America.

As some bloggers have shrewdly pointed out, Obama does best in areas that have either a large concentration of African-American voters or hardly any at all, but he struggles in places where the population is decidedly mixed.

What this suggests, perhaps, is that living in close proximity to other races — sharing industries and schools and sports arenas — actually makes Americans less sanguine about racial harmony rather than more so. The growing counties an hour’s drive from Cleveland and St. Louis are filled with white voters whose parents fled the industrial cities of their youth before a wave of African-Americans and for whom social friction and economic competition, especially in an age of declining opportunity, are as much a part of daily life as traffic and mortgage payments. As Erica Goode wrote in these pages last year, Robert Putnam and other sociologists have, in fact, found that people living in more diverse areas evince less trust for others — no matter what their race. Maybe it shouldn’t surprise us that while white Democrats in rural states are apparently willing to accept the notion of a racially transcendent candidate, those living in the shadow of postindustrial atrophy seem to have a harder time detaching from enduring stereotypes, and they may be less optimistic that the country as a whole would actually elect a black candidate.

I’ve pointed out the problem of trust in diverse areas in a prior post. This is one of the considerations that make one wonder what the future of a “diverse” and “multicultural” state can be. In my opinion it’s a bleak one, and the best that can be hoped for is a society like that of Brazil, with an affluent and nervous white minority living in a state of siege. In my humble opinion, a state not on an ethno-biological basis cannot hope to endure but must fracture and disintegrate.

Back in ’92, Buchanan raised the issue of whether the USA was going to remain a white country. Of course the poor fellow was immediately branded a bigot and extremist. Yet this question is key and people are sticking their heads in the sand by evading it.

And I see Buchanan echoes the Brazil metaphor:

And as one studies the latest projections of the Census Bureau, the America of our grandchildren will be another country altogether, a nation unrecognizable to our parents, a giant Brazil of the North.

By countries of origin, America will be a Third World nation. Our cities will look like Los Angeles today. Los Angeles and the cities of Texas, Arizona and California will look like Mexico City.

When we all belong to “minorities,” what will hold us together? With the rise of group rights and identity politics, we are already falling out and falling apart over racial preferences and ethnic entitlements.

America’s corporate elites want an endless supply of cheap labor…

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3 Responses to “Diversity and America’s future”

  1. Ariel said

    This is related to Obama but only indirectly related to diversity. Am I one of the few Americans who has wondered why Obama – who proclaims himself to be a unifier and a moderate – joined a militant black church and not an integrated, mainstream Protestant denomination? The racist comments of his long time friend and pastor, Jeremiah Wright (also known for his pro-Palestinian views and ascerbic criticism of Israel), should lead one to question just how moderate Obama really is. It’s hard to believe that after a 30+ year career in the ministry Wright suddenly changed his philosophy (I went to the church’s website and found a link to 14 of this clergyman’s sermons however it seemed to have been disabled. Maybe someone could help me out with this). The press reported the fact that Obama’s church in Chicago awarded Louis Farrahkan their highest award. Apparently Wright has public stated that he is a close friend of Farrahkan. I find all this troubling. If Obama is an intellectual and a liberal, why didn’t he join a more thinking church – say the Episcopalians or the Quakers? His association with Trinity United Church of Christ goes back to the early 90’s, so it seems to me a matter that should not be taken lightly.

  2. alifinmath said

    Obama is all surface glitter and no depth — but in this respect I don’t think he differs from most other “charismatic” politicians. There are rumors around that he’s a closet black separatist himself (along with his wife) but at the moment I can’t give more substance to these allegations. Incidentally, black separatism is music to the ears of white separatists and nationalists who want nothing more than that blacks (and Mexicans) go their own way and that the charade of a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural society come to an abrupt end. There is a bit of double standards in this that deserves to be savored: were Obama a white candidate with even the faintest whiff of white nationalism about him, this would jeopardise his candidacy. The irony resides in the fact that many white liberals are willing to give Obama a chance because they believe in the notion of a multi-cultural color-blind USA — yet Obama himself inwardly possibly spurns the very notions of multi-ethnicity amd multi-culturalism that are giving him his chance.

  3. alifinmath said

    More on Obama here:

    http://www.vdare.com/buchanan/080320_obama.htm

    and here:

    http://www.vdare.com/epstein/080319_obama.htm

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